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Turnip Greens Frittata

Note: This recipe calls for white potatoes, but sweet potatoes work well, too.

Serves 4

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large or 2 small white potatoes, skin on and finely diced (no larger than 1/4-inch; 1 1/2 cups total)
  • 1 garlic clove, smashed and chopped
  • Salt
  • 1 to 2 bunches turnip greens, stems discarded and leaves sliced crosswise into 1/2-inch strips (you should have 4 cups loosely packed sliced greens)
  • 8 eggs, lightly beaten
  • Coarsely ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees. Warm the oil in a large skillet. Add the potatoes and cook over medium high heat until browned on the edges and soft in the center. Add the garlic and season with salt after the potatoes have been cooking for 2 minutes. Stir in the turnip greens and cook until wilted and tender, about 3 minutes.

2. Season the eggs with salt and pepper. Pour the eggs into the pan, sprinkle with the cheese and transfer to the oven. Bake until the frittata is just set, about 10 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes, then slice and serve.

Source: Amanda Hesser, Food52

Bertrand Farm Summer Interns 2017

Welcome to our intern crew this summer. We are already busy working and learning about agriculture and health.

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From left: Tyler, Leah, Lisa, Joseph, Maria

 

I choose to intern at Bertrand Farm because I saw the importance of local healthy food in our community. With all the talk about the harmful effects of high-fructose corn syrup and processed food, I feel a social responsibility to take part in the movement for responsible food production. Beside the fact that I love working on farms, I wanted to expand my limited knowledge of sustainable farming, seizing the opportunity to learn through first-hand experiences.          Joseph

I am a student at IUSB and am pursuing a minor in sustainability. The head of the sustainability department, Krista Bailey, suggested that I look into a couple internship opportunities in the sustainability field. One of the first examples she mentioned was working on a sustainable farm and I jumped on the opportunity right away. I am very excited to be involved in the program and am looking forward to learning about sustainable farming practices that I will strive to use in a career that will benefit not only me, but everyone and everything around me as well.      -Tyler

I am a senior undergraduate student at the University of Notre Dame. Originally from Indianapolis, I am a part time intern on the farm this summer. As a neuroscience major, I am involved in research with adolescent depression prevention and treatment; as a sustainability minor, I have interests in local food systems and sustainable agriculture.-    Maria

I had gardened organically (without knowing that’s what I was doing) when the kids were young, I want to learn how to translate that into a larger 2-5 acre farm setting.  Bertrand and a small degree in horticulture from Purdue are my last steps before starting out on my own. – Lisa

Hi! My name is Leah Fast and I just finished my freshman year at Notre Dame, where I am studying chemical engineering. I am from the metro Detroit area, and I am so excited to be at Bertrand Farm! My main interests in interning this summer are to learn about sustainable, organic agriculture and to help with farm camp. I am grateful for the opportunity to be here and I am looking forward to the rest of the summer! – Leah

 

 

 

 

 

CSA Week 6

Cropping up …

New produce this week or soon after includes beets and beet greens, turnips and turnip greens, strawberries, and nasturtiums. Green onions, kale, lettuce, sugar snap peas, and Swiss chard are continuing strong.

Remember to check the “Produce Index” page to find storage advice for this season’s produce to date, simple dishes, and recipe links all in one place. Helpful online recipe databases include Yummly (with personalized recipe searches) and Food52 (contains some good articles on food storage). Feel free to share other recipe or storage sources you’ve found helpful.

Beets and beet greens: Remove greens and store them tightly sealed in the refrigerator. Don’t wash until ready to use. If already washed, place a dry cloth or paper towel in the bag with the beet greens to absorb moisture; if not washed, place a slightly damp cloth or paper towel in the bag to provide humidity. Store beets sealed in the refrigerator. 

Nasturtiums: Store upright in a jar or other container of water (like flowers). These edible flowers provide a crisp, peppery flavor in a salad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strawberries:  Strawberries are best eaten soon after picking. Storing strawberries in the refrigerator will slow spoilage, but it will also compromise flavor. Store sealed with a cloth to absorb excess moisture. Don’t rinse until ready to use. Remove the green hulls only after rinsing to prevent berries soaking up rinse water.

Turnips and turnip greens: Remove greens and store them tightly sealed in the refrigerator. Don’t rinse until ready to use. If already rinsed, place a dry cloth or paper towel in the bag to absorb moisture; if not rinsed, place a slightly damp cloth or paper towel in the bag to provide humidity. Store turnips sealed in the refrigerator. 

 

Recipe: Asparagus with Pancetta and Pine Nuts

Serves 4

  • 4 oz. pancetta, diced
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 lb. asparagus,  sliced into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 1/4 cups leeks, thinly sliced crosswise
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • Zest of a lemon
  • 1 tsp orange zest (optional)
  • 2 tbsp toasted pine nuts
  • 1-2 tbsp Italian parsley, chopped
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

1. Sauté pancetta, stirring frequently, over medium heat, until crisp and lightly golden.

2. Add butter to pan. Add asparagus and leeks and sauté until asparagus is tender crisp (about 3-4 minutes).

3. Add garlic, lemon and orange zest, toasted pine nuts, and parsley and sauté until fragrant (about 1 minute). Season to taste with freshly ground pepper and salt and serve.

Source: kaykay, Food52

CSA Week 5

In this week’s box:
arugula, asparagus, kale, leeks, leek scapes, lettuce, spinach, sugar anne peas, swiss chard,
& a bouquet of sweet william flowers

Remember to check the “Produce Index” page to find storage advice for this season’s produce to date, simple dishes, and recipe links all in one place. Below are storage tips for new produce.

Asparagus: Store upright in a jar or other container of water (like flowers) with a plastic bag over the jar to trap moisture and create a humid environment. Place in the refrigerator.

Leek Scapes: Store sealed (with leeks, if you would like) in the refrigerator. Or store like asparagus.

 

Leek scapes are long, thin stalks with bulbs that taper to a point. (In photo: The leek scapes are leaning against the basket.)

 

 

 

 

 

Sugar Anne Peas (sugar snap peas): For most varieties of peas, store tightly sealed in the coldest part of the refrigerator.

Note: Best when eaten soon after picked. Their flavor, particularly their sweetness, fades noticeably with each passing day.

 

 

 

 

Swiss Chard: Keep tightly sealed in the refrigerator. Don’t wash until ready to use. If already washed, place a dry cloth or paper towel in the bag with the lettuce to absorb moisture; if not washed, place a slightly damp cloth or paper towel in the bag to provide slight humidity.

CSA Week 4

In this week’s box:
asparagus, kale, leeks, lettuce, radishes, spinach, & spring onions

The “Produce Index” page provides storage advice for this season’s produce to date, simple dishes, and recipe links all in one place. The “simple dishes” found under entries provide easy, no-recipe, no-fuss ways to prepare the featured produce.

Please check the Produce Index for updates on storage advice including photos of storage techniques.

Recipe: Leek & Spinach Soup

Serves 8 to 10

  • 6 to 8 leeks
  • 6 ounces spinach, pulsed in food processor or chopped coarsely
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 Parmesan cheese rind (optional)
  • 6 to 8 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 2 cups cooked rice or pasta
  • Freshly grated Edam, Gouda or Parmesan (optional)
  • Lemon (optional)

1. Thinly slice all of the leeks and place in a large bowl filled with cold water. Stir and let stand for five minutes to allow any dirt to settle to the bottom.

2. Place butter and olive oil in large soup pot over low heat. Scoop out leeks from bowl of water and place in pot—any water clinging to the leeks is just fine. Season with a big pinch of salt. Cover pan and cook for ten minutes. Remove lid and continue cooking over low to medium-low heat for another 15 to 20 minutes, or until leeks are soft and have shrunk down considerably. The leeks shouldn’t begin to brown or get caramelized; they should be soft and giving up lots of liquid.

3. Add cheese rind (optional) and 6 cups of stock. Let simmer over low heat for 15 minutes. Taste and adjust for salt and pepper. Add remaining stock if necessary. (If your leeks are big and/or you’ve used 8 of them, you might need the extra 2 cups.)

4. At this point, you have a few options. If you’re making the soup for a crowd, you can add all of the spinach to the pot at once. (If not, you might want to keep the spinach separate—it quickly loses its bright green hue once it enters the broth.) If you’re making a small batch of soup, heat a small amount of broth in a separate pot with however much spinach you would like.

5. Add cooked rice or pasta to individual soup bowls. Ladle leek broth over the top.

6. Serve with grated cheese and a wedge of lemon on the side.

Source: adapted from Alexandra Stafford, Food52

CSA Week 3

In this week’s box:
kale, leeks, lettuce, radishes, spinach, & spring onions

Remember to check the “Produce Index” page to find storage advice for this season’s produce to date, simple dishes, and recipe links all in one place. Below are storage tips for new produce.

Storage

Kale: Keep tightly sealed in the refrigerator. Don’t wash until ready to use. If already washed, place a dry cloth or paper towel in the bag with the lettuce to absorb moisture; if not washed, place a slightly damp cloth or paper towel in the bag to provide humidity.

Radishes: Remove tops, since the greens will pull moisture from the roots. Store radishes tightly sealed in the refrigerator. Store radish greens tightly sealed in the refrigerator. Don’t wash until ready to use. If already washed, place a dry cloth or paper towel in the bag with the greens to absorb moisture; if not washed, place a slightly damp cloth or paper towel in the bag to provide humidity.

A simple dish: Arrange radishes on a plate with softened butter and coarse salt. Rub a radish in butter, dip in salt, then eat!

 

 

 

Recipe: Leek Gratin

Serves 4 as a side

2oz prosciutto, cut into slivers (about 1/2 cup)
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan or Gruyère
7 to 9 medium leeks, trimmed, cleaned, and cut across 1/8 in pieces (about 2 1/2 cups); parboiled or steamed for 10-20 min (until easily pierced with a sharp knife)
1tsp kosher salt (less if the prosciutto is very salty)
3/4 cup heavy cream

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Grease a 9-in pie plate or baker with butter.
  2. Spread half of the prosciutto and a thin layer of cheese over the bottom of the dish. Lay out the leeks on top. Cover with the remaining prosciutto and sprinkle with salt. Pour the heavy cream over everything, then add remaining cheese.
  3. Bake for 30 min, or until brown and bubbling well.

source: Barbara Kafka, Vegetable Love

CSA Week 1

Welcome to the 2017 CSA season! New this year are weekly posts about what’s in your CSA box and how to store it; also watch for recipe posts that put your produce front and center. On the “Produce Index” page you’ll find the storage advice and recipe links all in one place. Be sure to comment with your own tips and recipes, as well.

In this week’s box:
leeks, lettuce, parsnips, spinach, & spring onions

Storage

Leeks: Trim off the greens (these can be frozen to use in stock) and store in the refrigerator in a bag with roots wrapped in a damp cloth or paper towel.

Lettuce: Keep tightly sealed in a bag in the refrigerator. Don’t wash until ready to use. If it’s been washed already, stick a dry cloth or paper towel in the bag with the lettuce to absorb moisture; if not washed, stick a slightly damp cloth or paper towel in the bag to provide humidity.

Parsnips: Remove tops, since the greens will pull moisture from the roots. Scrub clean and store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator.
One simple dish: Braised parsnips: peel and cut into rounds or sticks; place in a skillet with just enough water to cover the bottom and a knob of butter (maybe also a some minced garlic or shallots); cover and cook over medium heat until almost tender; remove the lid and increase heat to medium-high until the liquid evaporates. Sprinkle with salt and pepper; maybe a squeeze of lemon, too.

Spinach: Keep tightly sealed in a bag in the refrigerator. Don’t wash until ready to use. If it’s been washed already, stick a dry cloth or paper towel in the bag with the lettuce to absorb moisture; if not washed, stick a slightly damp cloth or paper towel in the bag to provide humidity.

Spring Onions: Store in refrigerator in a bag with roots wrapped in a damp cloth or paper towel. Alternatively, for longer storage, place in a glass with roots in water and a plastic bag or dampened cloth bag over the tops (trimmed if desired).

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